tumble-slug:

meganfoxrocksmyworld:

Reasons I love Megan Denise Fox.

Because if I don’t stand up for her, who will? Okay, I can name about 6 people that will, but we’re small voices that can’t do anything. But I’m not gonna stop standing up for her. Even if the media refuses to NOT take Michael’s side.
You don’t have to be a fan of Megan Fox to acknowledge the injustice Megan suffered on the set of Transformers from Michael Bay and his “loyal” crew. When Megan’s comment on Michael Bay came out, everyone sided with Michael Bay, calling Megan a “brat” or “ungrateful” and saying she should have kept her mouth shut. These are grown ass men and they couldn’t shrug off a comment from a 23 year old woman. This Behind the Scene clip is just a glimpse and I cannot even imagine what ended up on the cutting room floor. Detailed bullet point of their relationship throughout the years. (stops after Jonah Hex) [x]
Michael made Megan model wardrobe options (short shorts and belly tops) in front of a room full of men, made her audition by washing his car in a bikini while he filmed it (of which Michael Bay hasn’t denied) And while the disgusting 3 quarters of the planet will side with Michael saying Megan’s a “whore” and “agreed to it anyways” or “asked for it”, do not know her side of the story. Megan’s wanted to act for her entire life stemming from Judy Garland and Marilyn Monroe.Day in and day out for both Transformers movies, Megan had this tyrant barking orders at her about bending over the car, arch her back and dictating what she wore and even naming her character after himself. Michael Bay is disgusting. I don’t care what Megan says about him now, it doesn’t excuse how he treated her and dragged her name through the mud. Megan’s been on 12 movies so far and has only had ONE crew complain about her. But to this day, people BELIEVE she’s the bad one to work with. That’s the power of this piece of shit, Michael Bay.

what the fuck she looks so fucking creeped out leave her the fuck alone you moldy old fuck 

(Source: MeganFoxRocksMyWorld)

jas720:

tashabilities:

mediamattersforamerica:

For its Ebola coverage, CNN turned to Robin Cook, author of the fictional thriller Outbreak.

The FUCK?

Come on CNN you are getting to Fox News levels of “this person is completely unqualified to speak on this subject”

occultperiodontitis666:

blackfeminism:

asobbrokeup:

Four seats

internalized colonialism

I can’t tell if he is reading or just pouting

littlepinkbeast:

the-real-seebs:

scloutier:

I’m so sorry, Mom, but IT’S SUCH AN ACCURATE DEPICTION of what I thought of the authors when I was reading certain books for middle school English class.  Although my PG brain did not supply the correct imagery.

That is pretty much exactly what they are like, too.

And high school.  And college.
littlepinkbeast:

the-real-seebs:

scloutier:

I’m so sorry, Mom, but IT’S SUCH AN ACCURATE DEPICTION of what I thought of the authors when I was reading certain books for middle school English class.  Although my PG brain did not supply the correct imagery.

That is pretty much exactly what they are like, too.

And high school.  And college.
littlepinkbeast:

the-real-seebs:

scloutier:

I’m so sorry, Mom, but IT’S SUCH AN ACCURATE DEPICTION of what I thought of the authors when I was reading certain books for middle school English class.  Although my PG brain did not supply the correct imagery.

That is pretty much exactly what they are like, too.

And high school.  And college.
littlepinkbeast:

the-real-seebs:

scloutier:

I’m so sorry, Mom, but IT’S SUCH AN ACCURATE DEPICTION of what I thought of the authors when I was reading certain books for middle school English class.  Although my PG brain did not supply the correct imagery.

That is pretty much exactly what they are like, too.

And high school.  And college.
littlepinkbeast:

the-real-seebs:

scloutier:

I’m so sorry, Mom, but IT’S SUCH AN ACCURATE DEPICTION of what I thought of the authors when I was reading certain books for middle school English class.  Although my PG brain did not supply the correct imagery.

That is pretty much exactly what they are like, too.

And high school.  And college.

littlepinkbeast:

the-real-seebs:

scloutier:

I’m so sorry, Mom, but IT’S SUCH AN ACCURATE DEPICTION of what I thought of the authors when I was reading certain books for middle school English class.  Although my PG brain did not supply the correct imagery.

That is pretty much exactly what they are like, too.

And high school.  And college.

(Source: petegamlen)

nu-rats:

raychillster:

stop romanticizing unhealthy relationships.

stop thinking you can change someone. you can’t. they need to change for themselves.

stop romanticizing the idea of you two being together some day. if it isn’t happening now, let it go. 

no more pouring your heart out for someone who gives you little to no reciprocation. 

find someone who values your long letters and passionate attempts. this person will reciprocate, with twice as much fire.

!!!!!

wooyouwhore:

I love this, honestly the realist representation

By Dave McElfatrick

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Designer Eleanor Lutz used high-speed video of five different flying species to create this graphic illustrating the curves swept out in their wingbeats. The curves are constructed from 15 points per wingbeat and are intended more as art than science, but they’re a fantastic visualization of several important concepts in flapping flight. For example, note the directionality of the curves as a whole. If you imagine a vector perpendicular to the wing curves, you’ll notice that the bat, goose, and dragonfly would all have vectors pointing forward and slightly upward. In contrast, the moth and hummingbird would have vectors pointing almost entirely upward. This is because the moth and hummingbird are hovering, so their wing strokes are oriented so that the force produced balances their weight. The bat, goose, and dragonfly are all engaged in forward flight, so the aerodynamic force they generate is directed to counter their weight and to provide thrust. (Image credit: E. Lutz; via io9)

sharibonbonvie:

micdotcom:

Potent minimalist art sends a strong message about police and vigilante brutality in America

Journalist and artist Shirin Barghi has created a gripping, thought-provoking series of graphics that not only examines racial prejudice in today’s America, but also captures the sense of humanity that often gets lost in news coverage. Titled “Last Words,” the graphics illustrate the last recorded words by Brown and other young black people — Trayvon Martin, Oscar Grant and others — who have been killed by police in recent years.
Let us not forget their voices


This.
sharibonbonvie:

micdotcom:

Potent minimalist art sends a strong message about police and vigilante brutality in America

Journalist and artist Shirin Barghi has created a gripping, thought-provoking series of graphics that not only examines racial prejudice in today’s America, but also captures the sense of humanity that often gets lost in news coverage. Titled “Last Words,” the graphics illustrate the last recorded words by Brown and other young black people — Trayvon Martin, Oscar Grant and others — who have been killed by police in recent years.
Let us not forget their voices


This.
sharibonbonvie:

micdotcom:

Potent minimalist art sends a strong message about police and vigilante brutality in America

Journalist and artist Shirin Barghi has created a gripping, thought-provoking series of graphics that not only examines racial prejudice in today’s America, but also captures the sense of humanity that often gets lost in news coverage. Titled “Last Words,” the graphics illustrate the last recorded words by Brown and other young black people — Trayvon Martin, Oscar Grant and others — who have been killed by police in recent years.
Let us not forget their voices


This.
sharibonbonvie:

micdotcom:

Potent minimalist art sends a strong message about police and vigilante brutality in America

Journalist and artist Shirin Barghi has created a gripping, thought-provoking series of graphics that not only examines racial prejudice in today’s America, but also captures the sense of humanity that often gets lost in news coverage. Titled “Last Words,” the graphics illustrate the last recorded words by Brown and other young black people — Trayvon Martin, Oscar Grant and others — who have been killed by police in recent years.
Let us not forget their voices


This.
sharibonbonvie:

micdotcom:

Potent minimalist art sends a strong message about police and vigilante brutality in America

Journalist and artist Shirin Barghi has created a gripping, thought-provoking series of graphics that not only examines racial prejudice in today’s America, but also captures the sense of humanity that often gets lost in news coverage. Titled “Last Words,” the graphics illustrate the last recorded words by Brown and other young black people — Trayvon Martin, Oscar Grant and others — who have been killed by police in recent years.
Let us not forget their voices


This.
sharibonbonvie:

micdotcom:

Potent minimalist art sends a strong message about police and vigilante brutality in America

Journalist and artist Shirin Barghi has created a gripping, thought-provoking series of graphics that not only examines racial prejudice in today’s America, but also captures the sense of humanity that often gets lost in news coverage. Titled “Last Words,” the graphics illustrate the last recorded words by Brown and other young black people — Trayvon Martin, Oscar Grant and others — who have been killed by police in recent years.
Let us not forget their voices


This.
sharibonbonvie:

micdotcom:

Potent minimalist art sends a strong message about police and vigilante brutality in America

Journalist and artist Shirin Barghi has created a gripping, thought-provoking series of graphics that not only examines racial prejudice in today’s America, but also captures the sense of humanity that often gets lost in news coverage. Titled “Last Words,” the graphics illustrate the last recorded words by Brown and other young black people — Trayvon Martin, Oscar Grant and others — who have been killed by police in recent years.
Let us not forget their voices


This.
sharibonbonvie:

micdotcom:

Potent minimalist art sends a strong message about police and vigilante brutality in America

Journalist and artist Shirin Barghi has created a gripping, thought-provoking series of graphics that not only examines racial prejudice in today’s America, but also captures the sense of humanity that often gets lost in news coverage. Titled “Last Words,” the graphics illustrate the last recorded words by Brown and other young black people — Trayvon Martin, Oscar Grant and others — who have been killed by police in recent years.
Let us not forget their voices


This.
sharibonbonvie:

micdotcom:

Potent minimalist art sends a strong message about police and vigilante brutality in America

Journalist and artist Shirin Barghi has created a gripping, thought-provoking series of graphics that not only examines racial prejudice in today’s America, but also captures the sense of humanity that often gets lost in news coverage. Titled “Last Words,” the graphics illustrate the last recorded words by Brown and other young black people — Trayvon Martin, Oscar Grant and others — who have been killed by police in recent years.
Let us not forget their voices


This.
sharibonbonvie:

micdotcom:

Potent minimalist art sends a strong message about police and vigilante brutality in America

Journalist and artist Shirin Barghi has created a gripping, thought-provoking series of graphics that not only examines racial prejudice in today’s America, but also captures the sense of humanity that often gets lost in news coverage. Titled “Last Words,” the graphics illustrate the last recorded words by Brown and other young black people — Trayvon Martin, Oscar Grant and others — who have been killed by police in recent years.
Let us not forget their voices


This.

sharibonbonvie:

micdotcom:

Potent minimalist art sends a strong message about police and vigilante brutality in America

Journalist and artist Shirin Barghi has created a gripping, thought-provoking series of graphics that not only examines racial prejudice in today’s America, but also captures the sense of humanity that often gets lost in news coverage. Titled “Last Words,” the graphics illustrate the last recorded words by Brown and other young black people — Trayvon Martin, Oscar Grant and others — who have been killed by police in recent years.

Let us not forget their voices

This.